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Towards a Communication Dialectic: Embedded Technology and the Enhancement of Place

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Towards a Communication Dialectic: Embedded Technology and the Enhancement of Place

Auteurs : Kristen Purcell

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RBID : ISTEX:3C885B572B7707E0A93A4FF30A0C9BDD4F856681

Abstract

Communication literature traditionally divides interaction into two forms: mass media and interpersonal communication. These ideal types are unquestionably useful heuristic tools. Yet their conceptual utility is often undermined when researchers place them at opposite ends of a linear, historical transformation in which mass media technology is believed to supplant interpersonal communication and the locations in which it occurs. This article abandons the polar, historical relationship in favor of a communication dialectic that recognizes the synthesis of ideal types into composite forms of interaction. Embedded technology demonstrates the dialectic by exploring how electronic media fixed within a physical location can combine with the interpersonal communication taking place there to enhance group interaction. The resulting hybrid defies the assumption that mass media simply displace interpersonal interaction, pointing instead to a dialectic relationship in which ideal types continually challenge and transform one another.


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DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-682X.1997.tb00432.x

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