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Methane oxidation in non-flooded soils as affected by crop production — invited paper

Identifieur interne : 000502 ( Main/Corpus ); précédent : 000501; suivant : 000503

Methane oxidation in non-flooded soils as affected by crop production — invited paper

Auteurs : Birgit W. Hütsch

Source :

RBID : ISTEX:60CCDF8F26A73F947099E8F41F542FA5F7A6EF8E

English descriptors

Abstract

Methane is an important greenhouse gas, which contributes approximately 20% to global warming. The atmospheric CH4 concentration is increasing rapidly, resulting from an imbalance between CH4 production and consumption. The only known biological CH4 sinks are soils where methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 by oxidizing it. For several reasons the CH4 uptake potential, particularly of arable soils and grassland, is only partly exploited, as several agricultural practices have adverse impacts on the activity of the CH4 oxidizing bacteria. The kind of land use in general has a remarkable influence with much higher oxidation rates under forest than under grassland or arable soil. Regular soil cultivation by ploughing and fertilization with ammonium or urea have been identified as main factors. Immediately after ammonium application the methanotrophic enzyme system is blocked, resulting in an inhibition of CH4 oxidation. In addition to this short-term effect a long-term effect exists after repeated ammonium fertilization, which is most likely caused by a shift in the population of soil microbes. Crop residues affect CH4 oxidation differently, depending on their C/N ratio: with a wide C/N ratio no effects are expected, whereas with a narrow C/N ratio strong inhibition was observed. Animal manure, particularly slurry, can cause CH4 emission immediately after application, whereas in the long run farmyard manure does not seem to have adverse impacts on CH4 oxidation. The methanotrophic activity decreased markedly with soil pH, although in many cases liming of acidified soils did not show a positive effect. Arable soils have a rather small pH range which allows CH4 oxidation, and the inhibitory effect of ammonium can partly result from a concomitant decrease in soil pH. Reduced tillage was identified as a measure to improve the methanotrophic activity of arable land, set aside of formerly ploughed soil points into the same direction. Plant growth itself is not primarily responsible for observed effects on CH4 oxidation, but secondary factors like differential pesticide treatments, changes in pH, or cultivation effects are more likely involved. Although for the overall CH4 fluxes the oxidation processes in agricultural soils are of minor importance, all available possibilities should be exhausted to improve or at least preserve their ability to oxidize CH4.

Url:
DOI: 10.1016/S1161-0301(01)00110-1

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ISTEX:60CCDF8F26A73F947099E8F41F542FA5F7A6EF8E

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<div type="abstract" xml:lang="en">Methane is an important greenhouse gas, which contributes approximately 20% to global warming. The atmospheric CH4 concentration is increasing rapidly, resulting from an imbalance between CH4 production and consumption. The only known biological CH4 sinks are soils where methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 by oxidizing it. For several reasons the CH4 uptake potential, particularly of arable soils and grassland, is only partly exploited, as several agricultural practices have adverse impacts on the activity of the CH4 oxidizing bacteria. The kind of land use in general has a remarkable influence with much higher oxidation rates under forest than under grassland or arable soil. Regular soil cultivation by ploughing and fertilization with ammonium or urea have been identified as main factors. Immediately after ammonium application the methanotrophic enzyme system is blocked, resulting in an inhibition of CH4 oxidation. In addition to this short-term effect a long-term effect exists after repeated ammonium fertilization, which is most likely caused by a shift in the population of soil microbes. Crop residues affect CH4 oxidation differently, depending on their C/N ratio: with a wide C/N ratio no effects are expected, whereas with a narrow C/N ratio strong inhibition was observed. Animal manure, particularly slurry, can cause CH4 emission immediately after application, whereas in the long run farmyard manure does not seem to have adverse impacts on CH4 oxidation. The methanotrophic activity decreased markedly with soil pH, although in many cases liming of acidified soils did not show a positive effect. Arable soils have a rather small pH range which allows CH4 oxidation, and the inhibitory effect of ammonium can partly result from a concomitant decrease in soil pH. Reduced tillage was identified as a measure to improve the methanotrophic activity of arable land, set aside of formerly ploughed soil points into the same direction. Plant growth itself is not primarily responsible for observed effects on CH4 oxidation, but secondary factors like differential pesticide treatments, changes in pH, or cultivation effects are more likely involved. Although for the overall CH4 fluxes the oxidation processes in agricultural soils are of minor importance, all available possibilities should be exhausted to improve or at least preserve their ability to oxidize CH4.</div>
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<note type="content">Fig. 1: Pathway of methane oxidation in methanotrophs and ammonia oxidation in ammonia oxidizers; PQQ, pyrroquinoline quinone; X and XH2 are the oxidized and reduced forms of an unknown electron donor (modified after Bedard and Knowles, 1989).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 2: A comparison of the long-term effects of mineral-N and farmyard manure application on the CH4 oxidation rates (mg CH4 m−2 per day), determined with soil from the ‘Broadbalk Wheat Experiment’ at Rothamsted; N0, N48, N96, N144=0, 48, 96, 144 kg N ha−1 per year as NH4NO3; FYM=35 t farmyard manure ha−1 per year; LSD=least significant difference (after Hütsch et al., 1993).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 3: A comparison of the effects of ammonium- and nitrate-based fertilizers on the oxidation of CH4 by soil; data are from the ‘Park Grass Experiment’ at Rothamsted. The plots have received 96 kg N ha−1 annually as (NH4)2SO4 or NaNO3 since 1858; at time of measurement the pH was similar in both plots (pH 6.2). Vertical lines are standard deviations (after Hütsch et al., 1994).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 4: CH4 oxidation of a loamy arable soil (a), and nitrate concentration in the soil (b), after NH4Cl and NaNO3 application (40 mg N kg−1) in comparison to the untreated soil. Means±S.D. (standard deviations) are given. CH4 oxidation in control and NaNO3 treatment was virtually the same resulting in only one curve (a) (Hütsch, 1998a).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 5: Influence of cation exchange capacity (CEC) on the effect of ammonium (NH4+) on methane (CH4) fluxes; results were obtained by computer simulations (modified after DeVisscher et al., 1998).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 6: Annual methane oxidation rates under seven forest ecosystems in Germany, plotted against soil pH (in H2O); the vegetation was beech on sites 1–4 and spruce on sites 5–7 (after Brumme and Borken, 1999).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 7: Methane oxidation rates (μg C kg−1 per day) in different soil layers, determined with sieved soil from the plough, no-tillage, and set aside treatments at a field site and from an adjacent forest site. Means±S.E. (standard errors) are given (Hütsch, 1998b).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 8: Relative methane oxidation in a sandy and a clayey soil after different treatments with pesticides; CH4 oxidation in the control (no pesticide applied) is set at 100% and the letters a and b indicate data which are significantly different from the control in the sandy and clayey soil, respectively (after Boeckx et al., 1998).</note>
<note type="content">Table 1: Atmospheric concentrations of the major greenhouse gases, their residence time, annual rise, concentration, radiative absorption potential, and contribution to the global warming (after Bouwman, 1990)</note>
<note type="content">Table 2: Estimated global source strengths and sinks for methane (from UNEP, 1993)</note>
<note type="content">Table 3: Methane oxidation rates of aerobic soils, measured over a range of land use types in various locations of the world; determined in flux measurements under field conditions (modified after Hütsch, 1998c)</note>
<note type="content">Table 4: Methane oxidation rates with different pH values, determined using intact soil cores (0–12 cm depth) from the N0 plot (no nitrogen fertilization) of the ‘Park Grass Experiment’ at Rothamsted (LSD=least significant difference; modified after Hütsch et al., 1994)</note>
<note type="content">Table 5: Mean annual methane uptake under wheat-fallow rotation and native sod at Sidney, Nebraska (USA), 1993–1995 (number in parenthesis is S.D.; after Kessavalou et al., 1998a)</note>
<note type="content">Table 6: Annual methane fluxes from an intensively and extensively fertilizeda potato field in 1996</note>
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<ce:label>1</ce:label>
<ce:note-para>Present address: Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenburg, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Adam-Kuckhoff-Str. 17b, D-06108 Halle (Saale), Germany.</ce:note-para>
</ce:footnote>
</ce:author-group>
<ce:date-received day="25" month="9" year="2000"></ce:date-received>
<ce:date-revised day="17" month="4" year="2001"></ce:date-revised>
<ce:date-accepted day="17" month="4" year="2001"></ce:date-accepted>
<ce:abstract>
<ce:section-title>Abstract</ce:section-title>
<ce:abstract-sec>
<ce:simple-para>Methane is an important greenhouse gas, which contributes approximately 20% to global warming. The atmospheric CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
concentration is increasing rapidly, resulting from an imbalance between CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
production and consumption. The only known biological CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
sinks are soils where methanotrophic bacteria consume CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
by oxidizing it. For several reasons the CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
uptake potential, particularly of arable soils and grassland, is only partly exploited, as several agricultural practices have adverse impacts on the activity of the CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidizing bacteria. The kind of land use in general has a remarkable influence with much higher oxidation rates under forest than under grassland or arable soil. Regular soil cultivation by ploughing and fertilization with ammonium or urea have been identified as main factors. Immediately after ammonium application the methanotrophic enzyme system is blocked, resulting in an inhibition of CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidation. In addition to this short-term effect a long-term effect exists after repeated ammonium fertilization, which is most likely caused by a shift in the population of soil microbes. Crop residues affect CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidation differently, depending on their C/N ratio: with a wide C/N ratio no effects are expected, whereas with a narrow C/N ratio strong inhibition was observed. Animal manure, particularly slurry, can cause CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
emission immediately after application, whereas in the long run farmyard manure does not seem to have adverse impacts on CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidation. The methanotrophic activity decreased markedly with soil pH, although in many cases liming of acidified soils did not show a positive effect. Arable soils have a rather small pH range which allows CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidation, and the inhibitory effect of ammonium can partly result from a concomitant decrease in soil pH. Reduced tillage was identified as a measure to improve the methanotrophic activity of arable land, set aside of formerly ploughed soil points into the same direction. Plant growth itself is not primarily responsible for observed effects on CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidation, but secondary factors like differential pesticide treatments, changes in pH, or cultivation effects are more likely involved. Although for the overall CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
fluxes the oxidation processes in agricultural soils are of minor importance, all available possibilities should be exhausted to improve or at least preserve their ability to oxidize CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
.</ce:simple-para>
</ce:abstract-sec>
</ce:abstract>
<ce:keywords class="keyword">
<ce:section-title>Keywords</ce:section-title>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>CH
<ce:inf>4</ce:inf>
oxidation</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Arable soil</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Grassland</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>N fertilization</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Land use</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Soil tillage</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Soil pH</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Liming</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Organic manure</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Crop management</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
<ce:keyword>
<ce:text>Vegetation</ce:text>
</ce:keyword>
</ce:keywords>
</head>
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<title>Methane oxidation in non-flooded soils as affected by crop production — invited paper</title>
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<title>Methane oxidation in non-flooded soils as affected by crop production — invited paper</title>
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<name type="personal">
<namePart type="given">Birgit W.</namePart>
<namePart type="family">Hütsch</namePart>
<affiliation>Institute of Plant Nutrition, Justus Liebig University, IFZ, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, D-35392 Giessen, Germany</affiliation>
<affiliation>E-mail: huetsch@landw.uni-halle.de</affiliation>
<description>Tel.: +49-345-55-22426; fax: +49-345-55-27113</description>
<description>Present address: Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenburg, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Adam-Kuckhoff-Str. 17b, D-06108 Halle (Saale), Germany.</description>
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<dateIssued encoding="w3cdtf">2001</dateIssued>
<dateValid encoding="w3cdtf">2001-04-17</dateValid>
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<abstract lang="en">Methane is an important greenhouse gas, which contributes approximately 20% to global warming. The atmospheric CH4 concentration is increasing rapidly, resulting from an imbalance between CH4 production and consumption. The only known biological CH4 sinks are soils where methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 by oxidizing it. For several reasons the CH4 uptake potential, particularly of arable soils and grassland, is only partly exploited, as several agricultural practices have adverse impacts on the activity of the CH4 oxidizing bacteria. The kind of land use in general has a remarkable influence with much higher oxidation rates under forest than under grassland or arable soil. Regular soil cultivation by ploughing and fertilization with ammonium or urea have been identified as main factors. Immediately after ammonium application the methanotrophic enzyme system is blocked, resulting in an inhibition of CH4 oxidation. In addition to this short-term effect a long-term effect exists after repeated ammonium fertilization, which is most likely caused by a shift in the population of soil microbes. Crop residues affect CH4 oxidation differently, depending on their C/N ratio: with a wide C/N ratio no effects are expected, whereas with a narrow C/N ratio strong inhibition was observed. Animal manure, particularly slurry, can cause CH4 emission immediately after application, whereas in the long run farmyard manure does not seem to have adverse impacts on CH4 oxidation. The methanotrophic activity decreased markedly with soil pH, although in many cases liming of acidified soils did not show a positive effect. Arable soils have a rather small pH range which allows CH4 oxidation, and the inhibitory effect of ammonium can partly result from a concomitant decrease in soil pH. Reduced tillage was identified as a measure to improve the methanotrophic activity of arable land, set aside of formerly ploughed soil points into the same direction. Plant growth itself is not primarily responsible for observed effects on CH4 oxidation, but secondary factors like differential pesticide treatments, changes in pH, or cultivation effects are more likely involved. Although for the overall CH4 fluxes the oxidation processes in agricultural soils are of minor importance, all available possibilities should be exhausted to improve or at least preserve their ability to oxidize CH4.</abstract>
<note type="content">Section title: Review</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 1: Pathway of methane oxidation in methanotrophs and ammonia oxidation in ammonia oxidizers; PQQ, pyrroquinoline quinone; X and XH2 are the oxidized and reduced forms of an unknown electron donor (modified after Bedard and Knowles, 1989).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 2: A comparison of the long-term effects of mineral-N and farmyard manure application on the CH4 oxidation rates (mg CH4 m−2 per day), determined with soil from the ‘Broadbalk Wheat Experiment’ at Rothamsted; N0, N48, N96, N144=0, 48, 96, 144 kg N ha−1 per year as NH4NO3; FYM=35 t farmyard manure ha−1 per year; LSD=least significant difference (after Hütsch et al., 1993).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 3: A comparison of the effects of ammonium- and nitrate-based fertilizers on the oxidation of CH4 by soil; data are from the ‘Park Grass Experiment’ at Rothamsted. The plots have received 96 kg N ha−1 annually as (NH4)2SO4 or NaNO3 since 1858; at time of measurement the pH was similar in both plots (pH 6.2). Vertical lines are standard deviations (after Hütsch et al., 1994).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 4: CH4 oxidation of a loamy arable soil (a), and nitrate concentration in the soil (b), after NH4Cl and NaNO3 application (40 mg N kg−1) in comparison to the untreated soil. Means±S.D. (standard deviations) are given. CH4 oxidation in control and NaNO3 treatment was virtually the same resulting in only one curve (a) (Hütsch, 1998a).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 5: Influence of cation exchange capacity (CEC) on the effect of ammonium (NH4+) on methane (CH4) fluxes; results were obtained by computer simulations (modified after DeVisscher et al., 1998).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 6: Annual methane oxidation rates under seven forest ecosystems in Germany, plotted against soil pH (in H2O); the vegetation was beech on sites 1–4 and spruce on sites 5–7 (after Brumme and Borken, 1999).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 7: Methane oxidation rates (μg C kg−1 per day) in different soil layers, determined with sieved soil from the plough, no-tillage, and set aside treatments at a field site and from an adjacent forest site. Means±S.E. (standard errors) are given (Hütsch, 1998b).</note>
<note type="content">Fig. 8: Relative methane oxidation in a sandy and a clayey soil after different treatments with pesticides; CH4 oxidation in the control (no pesticide applied) is set at 100% and the letters a and b indicate data which are significantly different from the control in the sandy and clayey soil, respectively (after Boeckx et al., 1998).</note>
<note type="content">Table 1: Atmospheric concentrations of the major greenhouse gases, their residence time, annual rise, concentration, radiative absorption potential, and contribution to the global warming (after Bouwman, 1990)</note>
<note type="content">Table 2: Estimated global source strengths and sinks for methane (from UNEP, 1993)</note>
<note type="content">Table 3: Methane oxidation rates of aerobic soils, measured over a range of land use types in various locations of the world; determined in flux measurements under field conditions (modified after Hütsch, 1998c)</note>
<note type="content">Table 4: Methane oxidation rates with different pH values, determined using intact soil cores (0–12 cm depth) from the N0 plot (no nitrogen fertilization) of the ‘Park Grass Experiment’ at Rothamsted (LSD=least significant difference; modified after Hütsch et al., 1994)</note>
<note type="content">Table 5: Mean annual methane uptake under wheat-fallow rotation and native sod at Sidney, Nebraska (USA), 1993–1995 (number in parenthesis is S.D.; after Kessavalou et al., 1998a)</note>
<note type="content">Table 6: Annual methane fluxes from an intensively and extensively fertilizeda potato field in 1996</note>
<subject lang="en">
<genre>Keywords</genre>
<topic>CH4 oxidation</topic>
<topic>Arable soil</topic>
<topic>Grassland</topic>
<topic>N fertilization</topic>
<topic>Land use</topic>
<topic>Soil tillage</topic>
<topic>Soil pH</topic>
<topic>Liming</topic>
<topic>Organic manure</topic>
<topic>Crop management</topic>
<topic>Vegetation</topic>
</subject>
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<title>European Journal of Agronomy</title>
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<titleInfo type="abbreviated">
<title>EURAGR</title>
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<genre type="Journal">journal</genre>
<originInfo>
<dateIssued encoding="w3cdtf">200107</dateIssued>
</originInfo>
<identifier type="ISSN">1161-0301</identifier>
<identifier type="PII">S1161-0301(00)X0025-1</identifier>
<part>
<date>200107</date>
<detail type="volume">
<number>14</number>
<caption>vol.</caption>
</detail>
<detail type="issue">
<number>4</number>
<caption>no.</caption>
</detail>
<extent unit="issue pages">
<start>237</start>
<end>314</end>
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<extent unit="pages">
<start>237</start>
<end>260</end>
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<identifier type="istex">60CCDF8F26A73F947099E8F41F542FA5F7A6EF8E</identifier>
<identifier type="DOI">10.1016/S1161-0301(01)00110-1</identifier>
<identifier type="PII">S1161-0301(01)00110-1</identifier>
<accessCondition type="use and reproduction" contentType="">© 2001Elsevier Science B.V.</accessCondition>
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