Serveur d'exploration sur l'opéra

Attention, ce site est en cours de développement !
Attention, site généré par des moyens informatiques à partir de corpus bruts.
Les informations ne sont donc pas validées.

Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30

Identifieur interne : 000D10 ( Pmc/Curation ); précédent : 000D09; suivant : 000D11

Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30

Auteurs : Dana L. Strait ; Samantha O'Connell ; Alexandra Parbery-Clark ; Nina Kraus [États-Unis]

Source :

RBID : PMC:4128708

Abstract

The perception and neural representation of acoustically similar speech sounds underlie language development. Music training hones the perception of minute acoustic differences that distinguish sounds; this training may generalize to speech processing given that adult musicians have enhanced neural differentiation of similar speech syllables compared with nonmusicians. Here, we asked whether this neural advantage in musicians is present early in life by assessing musically trained and untrained children as young as age 3. We assessed auditory brainstem responses to the speech syllables /ba/ and /ga/ as well as auditory and visual cognitive abilities in musicians and nonmusicians across 3 developmental time-points: preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults. Cross-phase analyses objectively measured the degree to which subcortical responses differed to these speech syllables in musicians and nonmusicians for each age group. Results reveal that musicians exhibit enhanced neural differentiation of stop consonants early in life and with as little as a few years of training. Furthermore, the extent of subcortical stop consonant distinction correlates with auditory-specific cognitive abilities (i.e., auditory working memory and attention). Results are interpreted according to a corticofugal framework for auditory learning in which subcortical processing enhancements are engendered by strengthened cognitive control over auditory function in musicians.


Url:
DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bht103
PubMed: 23599166
PubMed Central: 4128708

Links toward previous steps (curation, corpus...)


Links to Exploration step

PMC:4128708

Le document en format XML

<record>
<TEI>
<teiHeader>
<fileDesc>
<titleStmt>
<title xml:lang="en">Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30</title>
<author>
<name sortKey="Strait, Dana L" sort="Strait, Dana L" uniqKey="Strait D" first="Dana L." last="Strait">Dana L. Strait</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af1">
<institution>Institute for Neuroscience</institution>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<name sortKey="O Connell, Samantha" sort="O Connell, Samantha" uniqKey="O Connell S" first="Samantha" last="O'Connell">Samantha O'Connell</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<name sortKey="Parbery Clark, Alexandra" sort="Parbery Clark, Alexandra" uniqKey="Parbery Clark A" first="Alexandra" last="Parbery-Clark">Alexandra Parbery-Clark</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af3">
<addr-line>Department of Communication Sciences</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<name sortKey="Kraus, Nina" sort="Kraus, Nina" uniqKey="Kraus N" first="Nina" last="Kraus">Nina Kraus</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af1">
<institution>Institute for Neuroscience</institution>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af3">
<addr-line>Department of Communication Sciences</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff wicri:cut=" and" id="af4">
<addr-line>Department of Neurobiology and Physiology</addr-line>
</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation wicri:level="1">
<nlm:aff id="af5">
<addr-line>Department of Otolaryngology</addr-line>
,
<institution>Northwestern University</institution>
,
<addr-line>Evanston, IL</addr-line>
,
<country>USA</country>
</nlm:aff>
<country xml:lang="fr">États-Unis</country>
<wicri:regionArea># see nlm:aff country strict</wicri:regionArea>
</affiliation>
</author>
</titleStmt>
<publicationStmt>
<idno type="wicri:source">PMC</idno>
<idno type="pmid">23599166</idno>
<idno type="pmc">4128708</idno>
<idno type="url">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4128708</idno>
<idno type="RBID">PMC:4128708</idno>
<idno type="doi">10.1093/cercor/bht103</idno>
<date when="2013">2013</date>
<idno type="wicri:Area/Pmc/Corpus">000D10</idno>
<idno type="wicri:Area/Pmc/Curation">000D10</idno>
</publicationStmt>
<sourceDesc>
<biblStruct>
<analytic>
<title xml:lang="en" level="a" type="main">Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30</title>
<author>
<name sortKey="Strait, Dana L" sort="Strait, Dana L" uniqKey="Strait D" first="Dana L." last="Strait">Dana L. Strait</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af1">
<institution>Institute for Neuroscience</institution>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<name sortKey="O Connell, Samantha" sort="O Connell, Samantha" uniqKey="O Connell S" first="Samantha" last="O'Connell">Samantha O'Connell</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<name sortKey="Parbery Clark, Alexandra" sort="Parbery Clark, Alexandra" uniqKey="Parbery Clark A" first="Alexandra" last="Parbery-Clark">Alexandra Parbery-Clark</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af3">
<addr-line>Department of Communication Sciences</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
</author>
<author>
<name sortKey="Kraus, Nina" sort="Kraus, Nina" uniqKey="Kraus N" first="Nina" last="Kraus">Nina Kraus</name>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af1">
<institution>Institute for Neuroscience</institution>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af2">
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff id="af3">
<addr-line>Department of Communication Sciences</addr-line>
,</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation>
<nlm:aff wicri:cut=" and" id="af4">
<addr-line>Department of Neurobiology and Physiology</addr-line>
</nlm:aff>
</affiliation>
<affiliation wicri:level="1">
<nlm:aff id="af5">
<addr-line>Department of Otolaryngology</addr-line>
,
<institution>Northwestern University</institution>
,
<addr-line>Evanston, IL</addr-line>
,
<country>USA</country>
</nlm:aff>
<country xml:lang="fr">États-Unis</country>
<wicri:regionArea># see nlm:aff country strict</wicri:regionArea>
</affiliation>
</author>
</analytic>
<series>
<title level="j">Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY)</title>
<idno type="ISSN">1047-3211</idno>
<idno type="e-ISSN">1460-2199</idno>
<imprint>
<date when="2013">2013</date>
</imprint>
</series>
</biblStruct>
</sourceDesc>
</fileDesc>
<profileDesc>
<textClass></textClass>
</profileDesc>
</teiHeader>
<front>
<div type="abstract" xml:lang="en">
<p>The perception and neural representation of acoustically similar speech sounds underlie language development. Music training hones the perception of minute acoustic differences that distinguish sounds; this training may generalize to speech processing given that adult musicians have enhanced neural differentiation of similar speech syllables compared with nonmusicians. Here, we asked whether this neural advantage in musicians is present early in life by assessing musically trained and untrained children as young as age 3. We assessed auditory brainstem responses to the speech syllables /ba/ and /ga/ as well as auditory and visual cognitive abilities in musicians and nonmusicians across 3 developmental time-points: preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults. Cross-phase analyses objectively measured the degree to which subcortical responses differed to these speech syllables in musicians and nonmusicians for each age group. Results reveal that musicians exhibit enhanced neural differentiation of stop consonants early in life and with as little as a few years of training. Furthermore, the extent of subcortical stop consonant distinction correlates with auditory-specific cognitive abilities (i.e., auditory working memory and attention). Results are interpreted according to a corticofugal framework for auditory learning in which subcortical processing enhancements are engendered by strengthened cognitive control over auditory function in musicians.</p>
</div>
</front>
</TEI>
<pmc article-type="research-article">
<pmc-comment>The publisher of this article does not allow downloading of the full text in XML form.</pmc-comment>
<front>
<journal-meta>
<journal-id journal-id-type="nlm-ta">Cereb Cortex</journal-id>
<journal-id journal-id-type="iso-abbrev">Cereb. Cortex</journal-id>
<journal-id journal-id-type="publisher-id">cercor</journal-id>
<journal-id journal-id-type="hwp">cercor</journal-id>
<journal-title-group>
<journal-title>Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY)</journal-title>
</journal-title-group>
<issn pub-type="ppub">1047-3211</issn>
<issn pub-type="epub">1460-2199</issn>
<publisher>
<publisher-name>Oxford University Press</publisher-name>
</publisher>
</journal-meta>
<article-meta>
<article-id pub-id-type="pmid">23599166</article-id>
<article-id pub-id-type="pmc">4128708</article-id>
<article-id pub-id-type="doi">10.1093/cercor/bht103</article-id>
<article-id pub-id-type="publisher-id">bht103</article-id>
<article-categories>
<subj-group subj-group-type="heading">
<subject>Articles</subject>
</subj-group>
</article-categories>
<title-group>
<article-title>Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30</article-title>
</title-group>
<contrib-group>
<contrib contrib-type="author">
<name>
<surname>Strait</surname>
<given-names>Dana L.</given-names>
</name>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af1">1</xref>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af2">2</xref>
</contrib>
<contrib contrib-type="author">
<name>
<surname>O'Connell</surname>
<given-names>Samantha</given-names>
</name>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af2">2</xref>
</contrib>
<contrib contrib-type="author">
<name>
<surname>Parbery-Clark</surname>
<given-names>Alexandra</given-names>
</name>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af2">2</xref>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af3">3</xref>
</contrib>
<contrib contrib-type="author">
<name>
<surname>Kraus</surname>
<given-names>Nina</given-names>
</name>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af1">1</xref>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af2">2</xref>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af3">3</xref>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af4">4</xref>
<xref ref-type="aff" rid="af5">5</xref>
</contrib>
<aff id="af1">
<label>1</label>
<institution>Institute for Neuroscience</institution>
,</aff>
<aff id="af2">
<label>2</label>
<addr-line>Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory</addr-line>
,</aff>
<aff id="af3">
<label>3</label>
<addr-line>Department of Communication Sciences</addr-line>
,</aff>
<aff id="af4">
<label>4</label>
<addr-line>Department of Neurobiology and Physiology</addr-line>
and</aff>
<aff id="af5">
<label>5</label>
<addr-line>Department of Otolaryngology</addr-line>
,
<institution>Northwestern University</institution>
,
<addr-line>Evanston, IL</addr-line>
,
<country>USA</country>
</aff>
</contrib-group>
<author-notes>
<corresp>Address correspondence to Nina Kraus, Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, 2240 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. Email:
<email>nkraus@northwestern.edu</email>
;
<uri xlink:type="simple" xlink:href="http://www.brainvolts.northwestern.edu">http://www.brainvolts.northwestern.edu</uri>
</corresp>
</author-notes>
<pub-date pub-type="ppub">
<month>9</month>
<year>2014</year>
</pub-date>
<pub-date pub-type="epub">
<day>18</day>
<month>4</month>
<year>2013</year>
</pub-date>
<pub-date pub-type="pmc-release">
<day>1</day>
<month>9</month>
<year>2015</year>
</pub-date>
<pmc-comment> PMC Release delay is 12 months and 0 days and was based on the . </pmc-comment>
<volume>24</volume>
<issue>9</issue>
<fpage>2512</fpage>
<lpage>2521</lpage>
<permissions>
<copyright-statement>© The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com</copyright-statement>
<copyright-year>2013</copyright-year>
</permissions>
<self-uri content-type="pdf" xlink:type="simple" xlink:href="bht103.pdf"></self-uri>
<abstract>
<p>The perception and neural representation of acoustically similar speech sounds underlie language development. Music training hones the perception of minute acoustic differences that distinguish sounds; this training may generalize to speech processing given that adult musicians have enhanced neural differentiation of similar speech syllables compared with nonmusicians. Here, we asked whether this neural advantage in musicians is present early in life by assessing musically trained and untrained children as young as age 3. We assessed auditory brainstem responses to the speech syllables /ba/ and /ga/ as well as auditory and visual cognitive abilities in musicians and nonmusicians across 3 developmental time-points: preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults. Cross-phase analyses objectively measured the degree to which subcortical responses differed to these speech syllables in musicians and nonmusicians for each age group. Results reveal that musicians exhibit enhanced neural differentiation of stop consonants early in life and with as little as a few years of training. Furthermore, the extent of subcortical stop consonant distinction correlates with auditory-specific cognitive abilities (i.e., auditory working memory and attention). Results are interpreted according to a corticofugal framework for auditory learning in which subcortical processing enhancements are engendered by strengthened cognitive control over auditory function in musicians.</p>
</abstract>
<kwd-group>
<kwd>attention</kwd>
<kwd>auditory</kwd>
<kwd>brain</kwd>
<kwd>language</kwd>
<kwd>musical training</kwd>
</kwd-group>
</article-meta>
</front>
</pmc>
</record>

Pour manipuler ce document sous Unix (Dilib)

EXPLOR_STEP=$WICRI_ROOT/Wicri/Musique/explor/OperaV1/Data/Pmc/Curation
HfdSelect -h $EXPLOR_STEP/biblio.hfd -nk 000D10 | SxmlIndent | more

Ou

HfdSelect -h $EXPLOR_AREA/Data/Pmc/Curation/biblio.hfd -nk 000D10 | SxmlIndent | more

Pour mettre un lien sur cette page dans le réseau Wicri

{{Explor lien
   |wiki=    Wicri/Musique
   |area=    OperaV1
   |flux=    Pmc
   |étape=   Curation
   |type=    RBID
   |clé=     PMC:4128708
   |texte=   Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30
}}

Pour générer des pages wiki

HfdIndexSelect -h $EXPLOR_AREA/Data/Pmc/Curation/RBID.i   -Sk "pubmed:23599166" \
       | HfdSelect -Kh $EXPLOR_AREA/Data/Pmc/Curation/biblio.hfd   \
       | NlmPubMed2Wicri -a OperaV1 

Wicri

This area was generated with Dilib version V0.6.21.
Data generation: Thu Apr 14 14:59:05 2016. Site generation: Thu Oct 8 06:48:41 2020