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Death rates of characters in soap operas on British television: is a government health warning required?

Identifieur interne : 000873 ( PascalFrancis/Corpus ); précédent : 000872; suivant : 000874

Death rates of characters in soap operas on British television: is a government health warning required?

Auteurs : T. Crayford ; R. Hooper ; S. Evans

Source :

RBID : Pascal:98-0063036

Descripteurs français

English descriptors

Abstract

Objective: To measure mortality among characters in British soap operas on television. Design: Cohort analysis of deaths in EastEnders and Coronation Street, supplemented by an analysis of deaths in Brookside and Emmerdale. Main outcome measures: Standardised mortality ratios and the proportional mortality ratio for deaths attributable to external causes (E code of ICD-9 (international classification of diseases, ninth revision). Results: Staying alive in a television soap opera is not easy. Standardised mortality ratios for characters were among the highest for any occupation yet described (771 (95% confidence interval 415 to ll27) for characters in EastEnders), and this was not just because all causes of death were overrepresented. Deaths in soap operas were almost three times more likely to be from violent causes than would be expected from a character's age and sex. A character in EastEnders was twice as likely as a similar character in Coronation Street to die during an episode. Conclusions: The most dangerous job in the United Kingdom is not, as expected, bomb disposal expert, steeplejack, or Formula One racing driver but having a role in one of the United Kingdom's most well known soap operas. This is the first quantitative estimate of the size of the pinch of salt which should be taken when watching soap operas.

Notice en format standard (ISO 2709)

Pour connaître la documentation sur le format Inist Standard.

pA  
A01 01  1    @0 0959-8146
A03   1    @0 BMJ. Br. med. j. : (Int. ed.)
A05       @2 315
A06       @2 7123
A08 01  1  ENG  @1 Death rates of characters in soap operas on British television: is a government health warning required?
A11 01  1    @1 CRAYFORD (T.)
A11 02  1    @1 HOOPER (R.)
A11 03  1    @1 EVANS (S.)
A14 01      @1 Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, King's College Hospital @2 London, SE5 9RS @3 GBR @Z 1 aut. @Z 2 aut. @Z 3 aut.
A20       @1 1649-1652
A21       @1 1997
A23 01      @0 ENG
A43 01      @1 INIST @2 5002A @5 354000077339680090
A44       @0 0000 @1 © 1998 INIST-CNRS. All rights reserved.
A45       @0 5 ref.
A47 01  1    @0 98-0063036
A60       @1 P
A61       @0 A
A64   1    @0 BMJ. British medical journal : (International ed.)
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C01 01    ENG  @0 Objective: To measure mortality among characters in British soap operas on television. Design: Cohort analysis of deaths in EastEnders and Coronation Street, supplemented by an analysis of deaths in Brookside and Emmerdale. Main outcome measures: Standardised mortality ratios and the proportional mortality ratio for deaths attributable to external causes (E code of ICD-9 (international classification of diseases, ninth revision). Results: Staying alive in a television soap opera is not easy. Standardised mortality ratios for characters were among the highest for any occupation yet described (771 (95% confidence interval 415 to ll27) for characters in EastEnders), and this was not just because all causes of death were overrepresented. Deaths in soap operas were almost three times more likely to be from violent causes than would be expected from a character's age and sex. A character in EastEnders was twice as likely as a similar character in Coronation Street to die during an episode. Conclusions: The most dangerous job in the United Kingdom is not, as expected, bomb disposal expert, steeplejack, or Formula One racing driver but having a role in one of the United Kingdom's most well known soap operas. This is the first quantitative estimate of the size of the pinch of salt which should be taken when watching soap operas.
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C03 02  X  FRE  @0 Personnage littéraire @5 02
C03 02  X  ENG  @0 Literacy character @5 02
C03 02  X  SPA  @0 Personaje literario @5 02
C03 03  X  FRE  @0 Télévision @5 03
C03 03  X  ENG  @0 Television @5 03
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C03 03  X  SPA  @0 Televisión @5 03
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C03 04  X  SPA  @0 Hombre @5 21
C03 05  X  FRE  @0 Série télévisée @4 INC @5 86
C03 06  X  FRE  @0 Personnage fiction @4 INC @5 87
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Format Inist (serveur)

NO : PASCAL 98-0063036 INIST
ET : Death rates of characters in soap operas on British television: is a government health warning required?
AU : CRAYFORD (T.); HOOPER (R.); EVANS (S.)
AF : Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, King's College Hospital/London, SE5 9RS/Royaume-Uni (1 aut., 2 aut., 3 aut.)
DT : Publication en série; Niveau analytique
SO : BMJ. British medical journal : (International ed.); ISSN 0959-8146; Royaume-Uni; Da. 1997; Vol. 315; No. 7123; Pp. 1649-1652; Bibl. 5 ref.
LA : Anglais
EA : Objective: To measure mortality among characters in British soap operas on television. Design: Cohort analysis of deaths in EastEnders and Coronation Street, supplemented by an analysis of deaths in Brookside and Emmerdale. Main outcome measures: Standardised mortality ratios and the proportional mortality ratio for deaths attributable to external causes (E code of ICD-9 (international classification of diseases, ninth revision). Results: Staying alive in a television soap opera is not easy. Standardised mortality ratios for characters were among the highest for any occupation yet described (771 (95% confidence interval 415 to ll27) for characters in EastEnders), and this was not just because all causes of death were overrepresented. Deaths in soap operas were almost three times more likely to be from violent causes than would be expected from a character's age and sex. A character in EastEnders was twice as likely as a similar character in Coronation Street to die during an episode. Conclusions: The most dangerous job in the United Kingdom is not, as expected, bomb disposal expert, steeplejack, or Formula One racing driver but having a role in one of the United Kingdom's most well known soap operas. This is the first quantitative estimate of the size of the pinch of salt which should be taken when watching soap operas.
CC : 002B01
FD : Mortalité; Personnage littéraire; Télévision; Homme; Série télévisée; Personnage fiction
ED : Mortality; Literacy character; Television; Human
GD : Fernsehen
SD : Mortalidad; Personaje literario; Televisión; Hombre
LO : INIST-5002A.354000077339680090
ID : 98-0063036

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Pascal:98-0063036

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