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Are People Better at Recognizing Ambivalent Sexism on the Basis of the Non-standard Profiles than the Standard ASI Ones?

Identifieur interne : 000082 ( PascalFrancis/Corpus ); précédent : 000081; suivant : 000083

Are People Better at Recognizing Ambivalent Sexism on the Basis of the Non-standard Profiles than the Standard ASI Ones?

Auteurs : Tadios Chisango ; Gwatirera Javangwe

Source :

RBID : Pascal:12-0339989

Descripteurs français

English descriptors

Abstract

Kilianski and Rudman (1998) developed "standard" profiles of a benevolent and a hostile sexist man from the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) and tested if a U.S. sample of female students would perceive them as referring to the same person (i.e. an ambivalent sexist). Results showed that although they appraised the benevolent sexist profile favourably, and the hostile sexist one unfavourably, they considered it unlikely that they could refer to the same man. We developed "non-standard" profiles similar to those used by Kilianski and Rudman, with the major difference that they were not made directly from the ASI, but on the basis of attitudes and actions of a realistic soap-opera character, and tested if they would be considered as referring to the same individual by a sample of 238 undergraduate students (81 males and 157 females) at the University of Zimbabwe. Our results showed that both male and female participants found it as difficult to detect ambivalent sexism on the basis of non-standard ASI profiles as on the basis of standard ASI profiles.

Notice en format standard (ISO 2709)

Pour connaître la documentation sur le format Inist Standard.

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A08 01  1  ENG  @1 Are People Better at Recognizing Ambivalent Sexism on the Basis of the Non-standard Profiles than the Standard ASI Ones?
A11 01  1    @1 CHISANGO (Tadios)
A11 02  1    @1 JAVANGWE (Gwatirera)
A14 01      @1 School of Community and Human Development, Wits University, Umthombo Building, East Campus, Pvt Bag 3, Wits 2050 @2 Johannesburg @3 ZAF @Z 1 aut.
A14 02      @1 Department of Psychology, University of Zimbabwe, Mt Pleasant, P.O.Box MP 167 @2 Harare @3 ZWE @Z 2 aut.
A20       @1 69-82
A21       @1 2012
A23 01      @0 ENG
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A47 01  1    @0 12-0339989
A60       @1 P
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C01 01    ENG  @0 Kilianski and Rudman (1998) developed "standard" profiles of a benevolent and a hostile sexist man from the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) and tested if a U.S. sample of female students would perceive them as referring to the same person (i.e. an ambivalent sexist). Results showed that although they appraised the benevolent sexist profile favourably, and the hostile sexist one unfavourably, they considered it unlikely that they could refer to the same man. We developed "non-standard" profiles similar to those used by Kilianski and Rudman, with the major difference that they were not made directly from the ASI, but on the basis of attitudes and actions of a realistic soap-opera character, and tested if they would be considered as referring to the same individual by a sample of 238 undergraduate students (81 males and 157 females) at the University of Zimbabwe. Our results showed that both male and female participants found it as difficult to detect ambivalent sexism on the basis of non-standard ASI profiles as on the basis of standard ASI profiles.
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C03 01  X  ENG  @0 Ambivalence @5 01
C03 01  X  SPA  @0 Ambivalencia @5 01
C03 02  X  FRE  @0 Sexisme @5 02
C03 02  X  ENG  @0 Sexism @5 02
C03 02  X  SPA  @0 Sexismo @5 02
C03 03  X  FRE  @0 Hostilité @5 03
C03 03  X  ENG  @0 Hostility @5 03
C03 03  X  SPA  @0 Hostilidad @5 03
C03 04  X  FRE  @0 Milieu culturel @5 04
C03 04  X  ENG  @0 Cultural environment @5 04
C03 04  X  SPA  @0 Contexto cultural @5 04
C03 05  X  FRE  @0 Rôle sexuel @5 05
C03 05  X  ENG  @0 Sex role @5 05
C03 05  X  SPA  @0 Rol sexual @5 05
C03 06  X  FRE  @0 Homme @5 18
C03 06  X  ENG  @0 Human @5 18
C03 06  X  SPA  @0 Hombre @5 18
C07 01  X  FRE  @0 Environnement social @5 37
C07 01  X  ENG  @0 Social environment @5 37
C07 01  X  SPA  @0 Contexto social @5 37
N21       @1 261

Format Inist (serveur)

NO : PASCAL 12-0339989 INIST
ET : Are People Better at Recognizing Ambivalent Sexism on the Basis of the Non-standard Profiles than the Standard ASI Ones?
AU : CHISANGO (Tadios); JAVANGWE (Gwatirera)
AF : School of Community and Human Development, Wits University, Umthombo Building, East Campus, Pvt Bag 3, Wits 2050/Johannesburg/Afrique du Sud (1 aut.); Department of Psychology, University of Zimbabwe, Mt Pleasant, P.O.Box MP 167/Harare/Zimbabwe (2 aut.)
DT : Publication en série; Niveau analytique
SO : Sex roles; ISSN 0360-0025; Allemagne; Da. 2012; Vol. 67; No. 1-2; Pp. 69-82; Bibl. 3/4 p.
LA : Anglais
EA : Kilianski and Rudman (1998) developed "standard" profiles of a benevolent and a hostile sexist man from the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) and tested if a U.S. sample of female students would perceive them as referring to the same person (i.e. an ambivalent sexist). Results showed that although they appraised the benevolent sexist profile favourably, and the hostile sexist one unfavourably, they considered it unlikely that they could refer to the same man. We developed "non-standard" profiles similar to those used by Kilianski and Rudman, with the major difference that they were not made directly from the ASI, but on the basis of attitudes and actions of a realistic soap-opera character, and tested if they would be considered as referring to the same individual by a sample of 238 undergraduate students (81 males and 157 females) at the University of Zimbabwe. Our results showed that both male and female participants found it as difficult to detect ambivalent sexism on the basis of non-standard ASI profiles as on the basis of standard ASI profiles.
CC : 002A26M08
FD : Ambivalence; Sexisme; Hostilité; Milieu culturel; Rôle sexuel; Homme
FG : Environnement social
ED : Ambivalence; Sexism; Hostility; Cultural environment; Sex role; Human
EG : Social environment
SD : Ambivalencia; Sexismo; Hostilidad; Contexto cultural; Rol sexual; Hombre
LO : INIST-15762.354000500812990060
ID : 12-0339989

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Pascal:12-0339989

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